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Natura 2000: man and nature go together

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The existence of many of these species is today at risk. The red list of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources includes over 800 animal species and 180 plant species in Europe that are slipping at various rates down the slope towards extinction. This is the case for half the species of mammals and a third of the species of reptiles, birds and fish. 79 European animals are "in serious danger of extinction", which means that it may prove impossible to maintain them in the wild within the next ten years: such is the case for the European sturgeon, the Mediterranean monk seal, the saw-fish, the leatherback turtle, the pardel lynx and many species of molluscs.The disappearance of species each day from the surface of the globe is a phenomenon known as "erosion of biodiversity". This process is happening in Europe. One way of helping nature to regain all its genetic richness is to protect the habitats of threatened species, notably by developing a network of protected natural areas.In 2004, the European Union initiated a network of protected sites called Natura 2000. But protection is not synonymous with the creation of sanctuaries. The objective of Natura 2000 is to maintain the ecological equilibrium of each site. To achieve this, the intervention of man, who has shaped nature since the Neolithic era, is often necessary, particularly in forested or rural areas. For example, meadows must be maintained by grazing cattle, water levels in humid zones must be maintained through aquaculture or rice growing.It is essential to preserve European biodiversity. This is not a question of aesthetic luxury; it is a necessity. The erosion of biodiversity is the sign of a breakdown in natural equilibrium. Man also depends on this equilibrium, which ensures the good quality of the agriculture and fishing that feed him, of the water that he drinks and the air that he breathes. Protecting habitats thus often involves the restoration of this natural equilibrium essential to man's well-being. Interviews: Patrick Murphy, European Commission, DG ENV, Nature & Biodiversity;
Jurij Dobravec, scientific expert, Triglav National Park, Slovenia;
Klemen Langus, director, Bohinj Tourist Office, Slovenia;
Marika Kose, head of projects, Luitemaa Nature Reserve, Estonia;
Ene Hunt, farmer in the Luitemaa Nature Reserve. Visit the site: www.mostra.com
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