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Libri.itNAOMI CAMPBELL - XL - Updated EditionGRAN VAMPIRO 2LA SIGNORA STIRELLINAGREAT ESCAPES AFRICA (IEP) - edizione aggiornataROBERT CRUMB. SKETCHBOOK, VOL. 5: 1989 -1998
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Categoria: INFORMACIONES

Totale: 257

Electricity and Gas: You choose!

Already effective in nine Member States, the liberalisation of gas and electricity markets comes into effect throughout the European Union from July 1, 2007. Consumers of electricity and gas across the whole EU now have the right to freely choose their supplier. Competitive prices, a quality service and consumers’ rights protection should be the benefits of this liberalisation, started more than 10 years ago by the European Commission. The liberalisation of the gas and electricity markets should also reinforce the interconnections between the Member States and guarantee supplies for all EU consumers.
What does it mean ?
The liberalisation of gas and electricity markets means that production and supply of energy become completely independent from transport and distribution. The whole process will not necessarily be assured by the same body. In practical terms, from now on there should be free competition between suppliers.
The goal of liberalisation is to guarantee supply for all consumers in the Union but also to ensure competitiveness of gas and electricity suppliers’ prices. This is overseen by national public authorities: the European gas and electricity regulators.
Andris Piebalgs: EU Commissioner for EnergyMeglena Kuneva: EU Commissioner for Consumer ProtectionAllan Asher: Chief Executive of Energywatch, UKRichard: Consumer, UKPatricia de Suzzoni: Commission for Energy Regulation, FranceFrancis Ghigny: President of the Walloon Commission for EnergyJacqueline: Consumer, BelgiumGuy: Consumer, Belgium
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CITES: protecting endangered species

Commonly referred to by its acronym of CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora is a long-standing international agreement adopted in Washington in 1973, under the aegis of the United Nations. It has been in force since 1975. The 171 States (including the Member States of the European Union) who subscribe to this convention are committed to regulating international trade in wild animals and plants so as to prevent the threat of trade to species in danger of extinction. The European Union is an active participant.International trade in wild animals and plants is worth nearly 10 billion Euro per annum: this is an important resource that must be managed with the greatest care if we are to avoid the extinction of already endangered species of flora and fauna through unsustainable market demand. This is the objective of CITES.
Boaze Chizuwa: Tourist guide, Chiawa Camp
Adrian Hudson: Director of operations, Conservation Lower Zambezi
Allan Bwalya: Headmaster, Mugurameno Basic School
Soda Nyatsanga:President of the Resource Management Committee
Francesca Chisangano: Director of CITES, ZAWA
Nelson Mukuka: fisherman
Kevin van Jaarsveldt: CITES crocodile expert
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Living with Climate Change

Global warming is happening. Temperatures have already risen by 0.76 degrees since the industrial revolution and are projected to rise further by 1.8 - 4 degrees by the end of the century. The last time climate change happened at this pace was 125,000 years ago and led to a 4-6 metre sea level rise.
Global warming at the upper end of the scale predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change would have catastrophic consequences for Europe. Up to 30% of plant, animal and bird species would be wiped out and the threat of natural disasters such as landslides, floods and mudslides would increase significantly.
Interviews:
Christoph Bissig: Head of Moutain Rescue - Titlis.
Dr. Michael Zemp: University of Zurich.
Dr. Stephan Singer: WWF European Policy Office
Antonio Moreno Soriano: Farmer, Murcia Region
Peter Carl: Director General European Comission Environment Directorate
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Road Safety: Everybody's Business

The first-ever European Road Safety Day, dedicated to young drivers, will be held in Brussels on 27 April 2007.
The event is the European Commission's way of reminding young people that road safety is everyone's business. It is also meant to help maintain the impetus around its action programme aimed at saving 25 000 lives a year in 2010 compared to 2001, in other words, halving the 50 000 fatalities registered in 2001.
Interviews:Jacques Barrot: Vice President of the European Commission responsible for Transport.
Serge Morelli: President CLUB 14.
Ivan Hodac: Secretary General ACEA, European Automobile Manufacturers Association.
Patrick Goeyvaerts: Truck Driver and Relation Coordinator, Daimler Chrysler.
Angela Stolte Neumann: Head of Traffic Management, The City of Cologne.
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Turning waste into resources

As Europe grows wealthier it creates more and more rubbish. Every man, woman and child in the EU generates over a kilo of waste every day. Multiply that figure by nearly half a billion EU citizens and it quickly becomes clear that managing our waste without harming the environment is a major headache.
European citizens are deeply concerned about the waste mountain building up around them and there is a growing realization that we cannot continue dumping vast quantities of rubbish without serious environmental consequences. But this has not stopped the amount of waste generated in Europe increasing by 10% between 1985 and 1995. There has been progress in some areas ? municipal waste has declined in some central European countries, composting and recycling rates have increased and there is less reliance on landfills ? but the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development still estimates that by 2020 we could be generating 45% more waste than we did in 1995. Obviously we must reverse this trend if we are to avoid being submerged in rubbish..
Interviews:Bill Duncan: Assurre.
Nick van Kessel: Rhenoy Autodemontage.
Simon Linington: Vice President - Rennes Metropole.
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Protecting the tree of Life

Europe is a continent of breathtaking natural beauty and dramatic contrasts. The EU?s 27 Member States stretch from the frozen Arctic Circle in the north to the warm Mediterranean waters in the south. From the wave-lashed Atlantic coast in Ireland to the snow-capped Carpathian mountains in Romania, the EU includes a vast range of natural habitats and a great diversity of flora and fauna.
Our natural heritage includes several thousand types of habitat, 520 species of bird, 10 000 plant species and at least 100 000 species of invertebrate. Yet, in comparison with other regions in the world, these numbers are relatively modest. Europe is the most urbanized and densely populated continent in the world. It is also one of the most polluted. These factors have taken their toll on the natural environment.
Interviews:Tony Long: WWF.
Zsolt Vegvari: Conservation Biologist - Hortobay National Park.
Simon Linington: Kew Royal Botanic Gardens, UK.
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El Noticiero Latino Americano - N° 017

El Noticiero Latino Americano - V Edición


Semanal latinoamericano desde la región de Liguria, Italia.

El tema de la globalización, con su secuela de arquitecturas financieras y sistemas económicos que condicionan el desarrollo de buena parte del mundo fue uno de los argumentos que abordamos para nuestra sección Encuentros con el Director de la Fundación de Paz de Madrid...

El saber antiguo y precioso de los Incas, fundadores de un imperio inmenso y pujante; podría volver a vivir sobre las altas cimas de Los Andes merced a la creación de la Universidad de la Vida y de la Paz.

En 2001 una crisis económica de proporciones históricos golpeó con dureza a la Argentina afectando muchos de los aspectos de esa sociedad. A pesar de aquello el tango, uno de sus géneros artísticos más representativos, supo mantener con fuerza su difusión internacional.

Escribe a: info@noticieroliguria.com
Visita el sitio: www.noticieroliguria.com

Giving Europe more breathing space

Clean air is essential to our own health and that of the environment. But since the industrial revolution, the quality of the air we breathe has deteriorated considerably - mainly as a result of human activities. Rising industrial and energy production, the burning of fossil fuels and the dramatic rise in traffic on our roads all contribute to air pollution in our towns and cities - and damage our natural environment.
Centuries of treating nature like a dustbin has had disastrous consequences on our environment. For example, around 20 % of forests and lakes in Scandinavia are dead and another 30% have been badly affected, mostly by air pollution from other countries. The ozone layer, which protects the earth from harmful ultra-violet radiation, has become thinner and thinner over the last 25 years ? despite international action to ban CFCs and other harmful substances. And global warming, caused by rising greenhouse gas emissions, has wreaked havoc with our climate, provoking storms, droughts and rising sea levels.
Interviews:Jan van den Heuvel: Rijmond Enviromental Protection Agency.
Steve Sawyer: Greenpeace.
Dr. Petr Endler: Paediatrician.
Christian Farrar - Hocklev:Health and enviroment Alliance
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Getting Europe's precious waters clean again

Most of Europe does not suffer from droughts, floods or poor water quality. Water-borne diseases, such as dysentery, are rare and most tap water is so clean it can be drunk without the danger of falling ill. However, water resources in Europe are, in many areas, under threat from a range of human activities, affecting the quality of inland and marine waters.
Almost a third of Europe?s population lives in countries that experience high water stress. Nitrate and pesticide pollution of groundwater, often caused by farming, remains a significant problem. And water shortages are a major headache in parts of southern Europe where there is a combination of low water availability and high demand from tourism and agriculture. Global warming will only exacerbate this problem for many Mediterranean states.
Interviews:Graham Wood: Inspector, FVO, Ireland.
Eric Poudelet: Head of unit, European Commission, Belgium.
Paola Testori Coggi: Director, European Comission,, Belgium.
Lucien Royen:Farmer, Belgium.
Antoine Cuvillier:Director, EFSA, Italy.
Muriel Detry:General Manager, DETRY, Belgium.
?arko Rov?cek:Chief Veterenary, Border Inspection Post, Slovenia.
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From Farm to Fork - Safe Food for European Consumers

Europe is the world's biggest importer and one of the top exporters. To maintain control over the diversity and quality of products within the member states, the european commission has developed laws, regulations and structures. Protecting the health of consumersis a priority in Europe.
The Food and Veterinary Office is located in grange, in Ireland. It is one of the branches of the European Comission charged with supervising the application of food safety laws in Europe. More than a hundred veterinary inspectors are based there.
Interviews:Graham Wood: Inspector, FVO, Ireland.
Eric Poudelet: Head of unit, European Commission, Belgium.
Paola Testori Coggi: Director, European Comission,, Belgium.
Lucien Royen:Farmer, Belgium.
Antoine Cuvillier:Director, EFSA, Italy.
Muriel Detry:General Manager, DETRY, Belgium.
?arko Rov?cek:Chief Veterenary, Border Inspection Post, Slovenia.
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